Traditional spanish food

What are Tapas and Where Do They Come From

The tapa is to Spanish cuisine what pasta is to Italians. This modest and exquisite gastronomic work, but without the air of grandeur, has become the letter of introduction of Spanish cuisine around the world. As journalist Juan Ferragut recalled more than 80 years ago, the tapa is "a distracted way of eating without realizing it". Small bites that have marked Spanish gastronomic culture. Some of the Tapas served on our Seville Food Tour But

The Ultimate Iberian Ham Guide · How to select the right Jamón Ibérico

When it comes to the world famous “Jamón Ibérico de Bellota”, suddenly even non-foodies start sniffing its exquisite aroma, cherishing its beautiful marbling and letting it gently melt on their tongue… What an experience and what a pleasure!! So no, not all cold cuts are the same. The ham is actually that rooted into Spanish culture, that even vegetarians might occasionally give into one slice or another. And difficult it is to avoid in our cuisine, since it adds

Best Tapas in Malaga – Going where the locals go

They say that eating tapas is an art form. That's why we're going to practice it thanks to this great tapas route in Malaga. The city has the best ingredients to enjoy its cuisine to the fullest: good weather, fresh products from the sea and the mountains, an excellent vegetable garden and, also, subtropical fruits such as avocado or mango. Here you will find a list of some of the best tapas bars in the center of the capital

18 amazing Andalusian foods in danger of disappearing

The international project “Ark of Taste” was created in 1996 by the organization Slow Food to elaborate a catalog of food products in danger of disappearing, and thus to capture the attention and sensitivity of the public. Maintaining food biodiversity is one of its main pillars and goals, as it is an incredible heritage of unique raw materials and excellent artisan products produced on a small scale, as well as long lost traditions, history and culture in general. Attempting

Black rice squid ink recipe-Arroz negro

Toya Legido_©ICEX Ingredients: 300 gr (baby) cuttlefish or squid 200 gr fish filet (monkfish, kingklip, school shark or any type of fish with a lot of meat and few bones) 2 ink sacs 2 ñoras (dried red pepper) 1 green pepper 4 tomatoes 2 cloves of garlic Olive oil Seasoning (parsley, saffron, white wine, salt- mashed) Fish stock, 8 cups Round- grain rice, 4 cups Prep: 10 min Cook: 40 min Yield:

Black rice, soupy rice and fideuá

If you read the article on the Paella, you know already about its origin and different ingredients with which you may enrich its flavor. Nevertheless, we haven’t told you yet that there are VERY different ways of preparing this appetizing rice dish and here we present you our favorite selection: black rice, soupy rice and fideuá. Less popular and less known to foreigners, but as tasty as the original Paella- we might even dare to

Top Ten Spanish Markets for Foodies

Spain is a country with lots of flavour. One of the best ways to enjoy so is by exploring its food markets: traditional places where visitors can find the freshest fruits, vegetables, meats and fishes. Some of the most famous markets include the Boquería in Barcelona, San Miguel in Madrid  or the Lonja del Barranco in Seville. However, in Spain Food Sherpas we would like to approach ten Spanish markets in which tradition rules: markets where neighbours do their

Andalusian gazpacho recipes

Cordoba style Salmorejo? Antequera style Porra? Andalusian gazpacho? Malaga style zoque? There are different andalusian gazpacho recipes in our region! The doubts can assault any lover of the local cuisine, when ordering porra, salmorejo, gazpacho or zoque. Dishes, which are mainly based on tomato and bread, along with oil, vinegar, garlic and salt. However, there are some differences that perhaps the visitor is unable to see (or taste), but that do nothing but to enlarge

Spain’s Essential Herbs and Spices

Condiments in any cuisine are their distinguishing elements, almost the soul, giving a unique personality to each dish. In the Mediterranean basin it couldn’t be any other way: cumin, tarragon, dill, sage, anise, thyme, fennel, mint, cinnamon, cloves... However, we will focus on Spain's essential herbs and spices we find most representative. Those, of which many can be found in nature, wild, and others that were brought centuries ago to the Iberian Peninsula from distant countries. And keep in mind: