The parks and gardens of Málaga began to be implemented in the city at the end of the 18th century thanks to its excellent climate and with a scientific purpose: The Minister of the Indies was then the Malaga native José de Gálvez and he set out to collect the largest number of seeds and plants of the American colonies.

Don José  had a farm in Almayate, on the east coast of Malaga and his gardener had in his turn a botanical garden in the Center of Malaga, on Calle de la Victoria, to supply plants to Spanish colonies in the North of Africa.

This gardener of the minister managed to make his garden in Malaga become an acclimatization garden: the American plants, before marching to the botanical gardens of Madrid or Aranjuez, acclimated for a while in this space thanks to the enviable climate of Malaga.

Cactus Garden in La Concepcion

Cactus Garden in La Concepcion

It is not surprising that if in 1791 the city had six gardens, by the end of the 19th century it had 150, many of them private. The nineteenth century, in fact, has left in the urban fabric of Malaga two of the most significant green areas.

The first of these, due to its importance, is the Historic Botanical Garden of La Concepción, on the outskirts of the city. It is considered the most important subtropical garden in Europe and as proof of its exuberance, in these lands was filmed in the 40s of the last century a Spanish film set in the jungle of the Philippines and also in the 80s of the twentieth century it served as the setting for a famous television ad for Colombian coffee.

La concepcion botanical garden

La concepcion botanical garden

Palm Trees, La Concepcion